Monthly Archives: November 2019

How Hearing Loss is Connected to Cognitive Decline

As we grow older, we are at a higher risk of having our cognitive skills and hearing decline. This often results in what’s called “senior moments” which occur more frequently when you’re genetically inclined towards dementia. Essentially, what this means is that as we grow older the connections between our brain cells become damaged or lost (a.k.a. brain atrophy, cognitive decline). The Link Between Cognitive Decline and Your Hearing In addition, there have been numerous studies conducted that show a definite association between hearing loss Read More +

What Older Women Gain From Fitness

Older women can reap some great benefits from exercising, including building muscle, gaining strength, and increasing both their stamina and their flexibility. This will also allow you to overcome things that most people commonly associate with aging like atrophy and concerns with bone density. Of course, you’ll need the correct plan, including some focus on your nutrition, for this to work. You’ll also need to approach this plan with a positive attitude. Considering we’re living in an age of instant gratification, maintaining this type of Read More +

What Sleep is Like for Seniors

Throughout the various stages of our lives we face different challenges when it comes to sleeping. Oftentimes, sleeping grows quite complicated when you’re a middle-aged adult. This is because your hormones that affect your sleep and your circadian rhythm starts changing. You’re also more likely to suffer from health issues that affect your sleep, such as chronic stress. What Sleep is Like When You’re in Your 60s While it seems unfair that when your life starts to become more sleep friendly your ability to sleep Read More +

How Bifocals May Increase Your Risk Of Falling

Unfortunately, falls are an extremely common problem for seniors. Not only do they oftentimes result in significant injuries, but these injuries can greatly decrease a person’s quality of life and may even result in their death. Nevertheless, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control says that one in four people over the age of 65 fall every year. This leads to many of them being admitted to the hospital with injuries costing around $67 billion per year for all involved. How to Reduce the Burden of Read More +